Pointers September 2018

Inside this issue:

Enhancing Forgiveness Outcomes: A Unique Approach
Forgiveness is an important touchstone for all Christians. At once we recognise it as central to Christ’s salvific mission (Matthew 26:28); link it to the work of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38); and, by inference, consider it vital in the life of the Church (Romans 12:9-21). However the practical realities of forgiving, or being forgiven, are both complex and subtle. Moreover, as both pastors and mental health professionals know, if forgiveness is got wrong resentment flourishes. For this reason practitioners should approach forgiveness with a clear methodology and achievable goals – not as an exploration of what might be possible. To this end the current paper will show readers how a simple
mathematical model can structure ‘forgiveness work’ and be used to identify appropriate goals (Chiera & Edwards, 2018). Implications and relevant pastoral examples will be provided.

Report on the 2018 Australian Population Association Conference
The Australian Population Association (APA) Conference, usually held every two years, draws together population experts, practitioners, policy makers, researchers and students from across Australia and beyond to explore important contemporary demographic and related issues relevant to Australia.

In memoriam – Dr Gerald Rose

Some notes on Graham Rossiter
Life to the Full: The changing landscape of contemporary spirituality: Implications for Catholic school Religious Education,
Kensington, NSW: Agora for Spiritual, Moral and Religious Education, 2018, ISBN: 978-0-9808681-5-9.

Professor Graham Rossiter is well known among those involved in Catholic Education in Australia. He has been teaching religious education for many years at Australian Catholic University (Sydney) and has written a number of substantial books. Among those books is the mammoth manual Reasons for Living: Education and Young People’s Search for Meaning, Identity and Spirituality: A Handbook (Crawford, M, and G Rossiter. Melbourne: ACER, 2006). Professor Rossiter has just released another book in which he summarises the major themes of his work on religious education. While the book is written for Catholic educators, it has broader implications for all educators in contemporary Western cultures. In many respects, his work parallels my own in Educating for Purposeful Living in a Post-traditional Age and Rossiter generously notes those parallels throughout his book.

CRA Staff and Approved Researchers

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Pointers June 2018

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
Providers of Religious Services in Australia in 2016

The profile of Australian clergy provides some insights into the vitality and health of the church as a whole. However, getting a reliable picture of Australian clergy across the denominations is almost impossible. There are many hundreds of denominations, some of which keep better records than others. In some places, clergy are appointed by local churches and have no wider recognition. In many places, the leaders of congregations are lay people who may or may not have had any training. Some denominations count retired people, while others count only those in active service. Some count those in administration and teaching who could be leading a congregation, while others do not.

Personal Income in the 2016 Census
In the 1933 Australian Census, in an attempt to assess the effects of the Great Depression in the early 1930s, a question about income was asked for the very first time. It has since been included in every Census since 1976.

Catholic Religious Orders and Recruitment, 2000-2015
In February 2018, a report on a large-scale study of recent recruitment to Catholic religious orders in Australia was released. The report uncovered some common characteristics of religious orders that are attracting new members. It also corrected two common misconceptions: first, that only conservative or traditional religious orders attract new members; and second, that only people who were born overseas are entering religious life in Australia.

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Children’s Prayer – A Multi-faith Perspective

This book provides strong arguments for giving prayer a central place in the education and nurture of children. It is based on research in Australian Catholic, parent-controlled Christian, Independent, Jewish, Muslim and government schools. The author demonstrates focused attention and care in the data collection from the words of children and their drawings of people praying. She takes us through her thorough processes of analysis and synthesis.

The research shows that prayer is valued by all children, whether they come from a religious background or not. For some children it is a way of associating with their communities and traditions of faith. For others, prayer is practised in an individualistic manner.

Prayer is a way to perceive and respond to the experiences of life. It can help in dealing with the challenging emotional states of anxiety, loneliness, fear, anger and guilt. It can give hope for the future. It provides a way of seeking help for others, as well as expressing praise and thanksgiving.

Vivienne Mountain has a background in teaching and in clinical counselling. She lectures in Spirituality and Ministry with Children at Stirling Theological College, University of Divinity, Australia. She has published three books as well as contributing chapters to a number of others and articles for national and international journals.

Vivienne Mountain PhD, MA (Theology), MA (Creative arts therapy), MA ( Philosophy and religion), B Ed, B Th.

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A Vision for effective Youth Ministry

Many young Australians are struggling with issues of mental health, anxiety about the future, and addictions to drugs. Behind these struggles are often questions of what life is all about. Youth ministry is more important today than at any time in recent history. Yet, many churches are finding it difficult to connect with youth beyond those whose families are involved in the church.

This book has arisen out of Australian research into youth ministry, from visiting youth groups and talking with youth leaders and the youth themselves. It offers a vision for the development of youth ministry, recognising the diversity of youth and the backgrounds from which they come.

It explores how to build a youth ministry team and the qualities needed in the team. It discusses issues of training, payment, and support for youth leaders and building bridges with parents, church and school.

What are the factors which will really make a difference in developing youth ministry? Based on research, our conclusions are:

  • The vision for developing the spirit of young people

  • The commitment of the whole church to youth ministry

  • The youth ministry team with strong relationships with God, each other, the youth, parents, the church and the wider society;

  • A diversity of activities: both age-specific and intergenerational for fun, friends, inquiry and developing the spirit.

The Authors:

Rev Dr Philip Hughes has had pastoral experience in inner city, suburban and rural churches, and has been the senior research officer of the Christian Research Association since 1985. He has two adult children and one grandchild.

Stephen Reid has worked for the Christian Research Association since 2007 and has one teenage child and two younger children.

Margaret Fraser has worked for the Christian Research Association since 2011. She has two children who are completing university and two who are teenagers.

All three authors were involved in interviews with youth, youth leaders, clergy and parents for this study.

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