Pointers March 2015

Pointers Vol25, No.1

Inside this Issue:

Why Young People are Leaving the Church

A large proportion of children who grow up attending a church in Australia, United Kingdom or the USA drop out of church attendance.
According to the 2009 International Social Survey Program, the drop-out rate in Australia was 72 per cent. In the United Kingdom, it was 57 per cent, and in the USA it was 47 per cent. Over the past four decades, the drop-out rate in the United Kingdom and Australia has not changed a great deal. Indeed, in Australia, there is some evidence of it decreasing. In the United States, it has been gradually climbing. A recent book has been prepared by the head of the Barna Group, David Kinnaman, exploring why young people are dropping out. The book is entitled You Lost Me: Why Young Christians are Leaving the Church … and Rethinking Faith.

Is there an Optimum Length of Ministry?

I was once talking with a colleague who mentioned that very often churches experience decline in attendance at worship services during the first few years of a new leader’s tenure, before recovering to experience growth, or declining even more. Our conversation moved on to cover possible solutions, or whether attendance fluctuation in congregational life was just an inevitable part of ministry. One wonders whether there is an optimum length of time Christian clergy should serve, and how the length of tenure affects growth or decline in church life. Does the newness and enthusiasm of a newly-appointed pastor assist in attracting people to church? Are attenders more comfortable with the long-term pastor, vicar or priest who knows everyone and maintains stability?


Coaching: An Essential Ingredient

Freedom of Speech

In the aftermath of the killing of the Charlie Hebdo journalists in France, millions of people came out onto the streets in France and in other places around the world in support of free speech. The murders were in response to controversial cartoons which were seen as mocking Muhammad. It was argued that free speech lay at the basis of Western democracy and that any attempt to limit free speech is a threat to our way of life.

Perspectives on Unemployment

Australia has a large and diligent labour force, comprising more than half of the population. Full-time and part-time employment are the two major sources of income for Australians, and as the labour force changes over time, finding and sustaining constant employment is becoming more and more difficult. Not only does employment provide money for essential staples such as food, water, shelter and electricity, it also provides a sense of self-worth and identity for many. Long-term employment allows for the development of skills, the expansion of social networks and the growth of friendships. By contrast, those who are unemployed have little to no continuous income, have less social interaction and may experience a loss of self-esteem and self-worth. Though unemployment seems overwhelmingly negative, it can often be a matter of perspective.

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