Pointers June 2018

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
Providers of Religious Services in Australia in 2016

The profile of Australian clergy provides some insights into the vitality and health of the church as a whole. However, getting a reliable picture of Australian clergy across the denominations is almost impossible. There are many hundreds of denominations, some of which keep better records than others. In some places, clergy are appointed by local churches and have no wider recognition. In many places, the leaders of congregations are lay people who may or may not have had any training. Some denominations count retired people, while others count only those in active service. Some count those in administration and teaching who could be leading a congregation, while others do not.

Personal Income in the 2016 Census
In the 1933 Australian Census, in an attempt to assess the effects of the Great Depression in the early 1930s, a question about income was asked for the very first time. It has since been included in every Census since 1976.

Catholic Religious Orders and Recruitment, 2000-2015
In February 2018, a report on a large-scale study of recent recruitment to Catholic religious orders in Australia was released. The report uncovered some common characteristics of religious orders that are attracting new members. It also corrected two common misconceptions: first, that only conservative or traditional religious orders attract new members; and second, that only people who were born overseas are entering religious life in Australia.

To purchase this issue: click here

Educating for Purposeful Living

This text represents the culmination of decades of Dr Hughes’ commitment, research, exploration and deeply held belief that young people need a sense of purpose if they are to lead lives of dignity and meaning. As schools and  educators grapple with how to better support young people, this advice is a valuable guide, provocation and context for action.
– Elisabeth Lenders, Principal, Kingswood College, Box Hill.

At a time when the value of religion and religious education is increasingly questioned in Australia, Philip Hughes’ new book takes a fresh and different approach to religious education and how schools can contribute positively to the future lives of their students. After examining the evidence about the effectiveness of existing approaches and strategies, he proposes what might be a more realistic, creative and fruitful path for schools to take in helping students develop purpose in life. I found this a stimulating discussion.

– Dr Jon Newton, Dean of Research and Postgraduate Studies, Harvest Bible College.

Philip Hughes has once again demonstrated his mastery of the field of religious education across a range of Christian faith traditions. In this book, he draws on his vast experience of survey and interview research with many thousands of students from Catholic, Independent and other schools around Australia to propose a very thoughtful and comprehensive approach to education that assists young people to develop a sense of purpose in life. In what Pope Francis has called a change of era, and not simply an era of change, all faith-based schools, indeed, all teachers in those schools, will do well to avail themselves of Dr Hughes’ wisdom and insight.

– Dr Bob Dixon, Retired Director, Australian Catholic Bishops Conference Pastoral Research Office

Dr Philip Hughes has spent most of his life in research on the spiritual and religious dimensions of culture and their expression in both religious organisations and schools. For 31 years, he was the senior research officer of the Christian Research Association. He also worked for 11 years at Edith Cowan University, and is an honorary Research Fellow with the University of Divinity and the Catholic Pastoral Research Office. He is now the chief supervisor for post-graduate research at Harvest Bible College. For 30 years, he has served on school councils, and for 10 years chaired the Council of Kingswood College, Box Hill. Philip Hughes has written more than 60 books and hundreds of articles.

To purchase your copy click here

Children’s Prayer – A Multi-faith Perspective

This book provides strong arguments for giving prayer a central place in the education and nurture of children. It is based on research in Australian Catholic, parent-controlled Christian, Independent, Jewish, Muslim and government schools. The author demonstrates focused attention and care in the data collection from the words of children and their drawings of people praying. She takes us through her thorough processes of analysis and synthesis.

The research shows that prayer is valued by all children, whether they come from a religious background or not. For some children it is a way of associating with their communities and traditions of faith. For others, prayer is practised in an individualistic manner.

Prayer is a way to perceive and respond to the experiences of life. It can help in dealing with the challenging emotional states of anxiety, loneliness, fear, anger and guilt. It can give hope for the future. It provides a way of seeking help for others, as well as expressing praise and thanksgiving.

Vivienne Mountain has a background in teaching and in clinical counselling. She lectures in Spirituality and Ministry with Children at Stirling Theological College, University of Divinity, Australia. She has published three books as well as contributing chapters to a number of others and articles for national and international journals.

Vivienne Mountain PhD, MA (Theology), MA (Creative arts therapy), MA ( Philosophy and religion), B Ed, B Th.

To Purchase : click here

A Vision for effective Youth Ministry

Many young Australians are struggling with issues of mental health, anxiety about the future, and addictions to drugs. Behind these struggles are often questions of what life is all about. Youth ministry is more important today than at any time in recent history. Yet, many churches are finding it difficult to connect with youth beyond those whose families are involved in the church.

This book has arisen out of Australian research into youth ministry, from visiting youth groups and talking with youth leaders and the youth themselves. It offers a vision for the development of youth ministry, recognising the diversity of youth and the backgrounds from which they come.

It explores how to build a youth ministry team and the qualities needed in the team. It discusses issues of training, payment, and support for youth leaders and building bridges with parents, church and school.

What are the factors which will really make a difference in developing youth ministry? Based on research, our conclusions are:

  • The vision for developing the spirit of young people

  • The commitment of the whole church to youth ministry

  • The youth ministry team with strong relationships with God, each other, the youth, parents, the church and the wider society;

  • A diversity of activities: both age-specific and intergenerational for fun, friends, inquiry and developing the spirit.

The Authors:

Rev Dr Philip Hughes has had pastoral experience in inner city, suburban and rural churches, and has been the senior research officer of the Christian Research Association since 1985. He has two adult children and one grandchild.

Stephen Reid has worked for the Christian Research Association since 2007 and has one teenage child and two younger children.

Margaret Fraser has worked for the Christian Research Association since 2011. She has two children who are completing university and two who are teenagers.

All three authors were involved in interviews with youth, youth leaders, clergy and parents for this study.

To Purchase – click here