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Australia’s Religious Communities: Facts And Figures

Australia’s Religious Communities: Facts and Figures – PDF

Australia’s Religious Communities: Facts and Figures provides statistical information on 90 religious groups in Australia. Using the 2011 Census and recent surveys, it describes the size of each group and the changes that have occurred over the years, the variation by capital city and state, the profile of age, and ethnic background and language. It also describes the people who are active in religious activities in the various groups.

This book is invaluable for leaders of religious groups, students of religion, and all who are interested in the changes that occurring in Australian society. The book is currently available as a pdf or hardcopy.

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Pointers Vol.22-4 For Downloading

Inside this issue:

  • The Impact of Recent Immigration on Religious Groups in Australia– Since World War II, immigration has played a huge role in  the development of religious faith in Australia. That role has been most evident in the place that many of the world’s religions now have in Australia. Since 1971, the number of Australians associated with a religion other than Christianity has risen from just 0.1 million to 1.5 million. However, many millions of the immigrants have been Christian and some denominations would hardly exist today without the enormous influx of members that immigration has brought. The 2011 Census shows that the story of immigration and its impact on the religious life of Australia is a continuing one.
  • Immigrant Ministers of Religion – Among the recent immigrants to Australia are 1,362 classified as ministers of religion. Of these, 1,242 were Christian, 22 were Buddhist, 32 were Hindu, 11 were Muslims, 25 were Jews, 19 were of other religions, and 11 described themselves as having no religion or as not stating their religion (possibly secular celebrants).
  • Encouragements and Discouragements in Reading the Bible –
    About 4 per cent of young people read the Bible daily, another 6 per cent read it at least once a week, and 15 to 20 per cent read it occasionally (Hughes, 2010). In 2009 and 2010, the CRA conducted 333 interviews with young people and youth leaders in youth groups across Australia to discover what encouraged and discouraged young people in reading the Bible. The project was commissioned by a group of organisations including The Bible Society, Scripture Union, YouthWorks, the Lutheran
    Church and The Salvation Army (Southern Territory).
  • Spiritual but not Religious  – In many parts of the Western world, belief in God as creator and as active in history is in decline. Yet people are increasingly looking for the meaning of life in ‘the Spirit’. This is occurring both within the churches, through Pentecostal and charismatic movements and through mystical movements, and outside the churches through the New Age movement and through interest in holistic  wellbeing. Why is this happening and what is its significance in  understanding our changing Western culture?
  • Ministry in Anglican Schools – While congregations are dwindling, church schools are growing. The proportion of Australians sending their children to schools associated with a Christian denomination has continued to grow for many years. Close to one-third of all students now attend a Christian school. Catholic schools are by far the largest part of this with more than 1,700 schools across Australia. The second largest group is the 147 Anglican schools. In many denominations, however,
    questions are being asked about why the denomination should sponsor schools, what their aims should be, and what forms of ministry are appropriate in schools where few students are committed to the Christian faith. A new book from Anglican Schools Australia, Ministry in Anglican Schools: Principles and Practicalities, explores some of these issues. (The following references are all to that book.)

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Pointers Vol.23-1 For Downloading

The Missing 1.8 Million. In 2001, the Census told us there were 12.8 million Christians. Between 2001 and 2011, 1.4 million children were born in Australia who were identified with a Christian denomination in the 2011 Census. In addition, 767,000 migrants arrived from overseas who identified with a Christian denomination. There should be nearly 15 million Christians. In fact, the Census counted only 13.15 million. This article looks at what has happened to the ‘missing Christians’.

Comparisons with Canada. Reginald Bibby has identified similar patterns in Canada to those we have found in Australia. Religion is not disappearing, but it is growing largely because of immigration to Canada, and there are challenges in ‘internal market for religion’.

Church Attendance among Young People. How many young people in Australia attend a church? Obtaining accurate answers is very difficult. This article identifies some of the problems with sampling and getting accurate information. We conclude that probably about 10 per cent of teenage Australians attend a church monthly or more – somewhat less than the average for the population.

Almost Christian’. In America, many young people attend, but research has indicated that they practice a highly diluted form of the Christian faith which some researchers have described as Moral Therapeutic Deism. Kenda Dean has written a book about the problem and suggested that teenagers are simply not being introduced to articulate, passionate Christian faith that changes lives. While her book contains many challenges for those involved in youth ministry and will assist us in our research on youth ministry, we wonder, however, how well she has understood the fact that young people today ‘put their own lives together’.

The Midi-Narrative of Students in Australia and India. The ways young people do put their lives together and some of the contextual influences on that process are illustrated in conversations with several groups of young people in India. These conversations also reflect two basic approaches to religion in our contemporary age: as tradition and as a personal life-style.

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Australia’s Religious Communities: Facts And Figures

Australia’s Religious Communities: Facts and Figures

An essential reference on Australia’s religious groups with the latest information from the Australian 2011 Census.  Church leaders and everyone interested in the changing profile of Australia’s profile will find this invaluable. This book describes the changing profile and participation in each religious group. Find here:

  • changing numbers – growth and decline,
  • the impact of immigration – and what languages immigrants use,
  • profile of age – and like trends in the future
  • who is participating in worship … and who is not.

Every religious group with over 1,000 people identifying with it is covered in the book. Are we really becoming a secular nation? How large, really, is the Moslem population in Australia and how fast is it growing? What is the fastest growing religious group in Australia? You will be surprised by many of the answers!

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Pointers Vol.22-3 For Downloading

Pointers Vol. 22-3 (September 2012)

Articles include:

The Persistence of Religion:What the Census Tells Us
When the 2011 Australian Census figures were first released on 21st June 2012, the percentage of Australians ticking the ‘no religion’ box made headlines. Newsreporters noted how Australia had become more secular. On talk-back radio, people either celebrated or lamented the increased numbers of atheists in Australia. However, the real story of the Census is somewhat different: it is a story of the persistence of religion.

Religion around Australia: Changing Populations
Whilst the previous article paints a national picture of religious identification according to the Census, different geographical areas throughout Australia have always revealed different pictures, particularly when one compares the capital cities to non-urban areas. States and Territories differ. Inner city areas can be different from the suburbs. Urban areas are different from rural areas. Different geographical areas have their own histories and traditions, and different denominations are stronger in some areas than in others.

CRA Annual Staff Report 2011-2012
CRA Chairman’s Report 2012

The City is my Parish?
Understanding the Hillsong Model

John Wesley is well-known for his ‘world’ outlook –

I look upon all the world as my parish; thus far I mean, that, in whatever part of it I am, I judge it meet, right, and my bounden duty to declare unto all that are willing to hear, the glad tidings of salvation. This is the work which I know God has called me to; and sure I am that His blessing attends it. (Journal: 11 June 1739).
Among Pentecostal churches, Hillsong* is the most widely known in Australia and internationally. The weekly attendance at its Sydney services alone is more than 20,000, making it the largest mega-church in Australia.

What are some features that are helpful to understanding
the increasingly global phenomenon that Hillsong has become?

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Pointers Vol.22-2 For Downloading

Pointers Vol. 22-2 (June 2012)

Articles include:

  • God’s Activity in Miracles –  It was reported in the Adelaide Advertiser at Easter time that around half of all Australians believe that Jesus was born of a virgin and that he walked on water. According to this report, Australians are ready to accept the existence of miracles. Mr McCrindle, the researcher, was quoted as saying: ‘This idea of a 21st century sceptical secular mind dominating is not accurate’. Was he right?
  • Homelessness –  When we think of homeless people we often think of those on the streets, dishevelled in appearance, roaming the rubbish bins for food, a blight on the social landscape which we wish would just disappear, or at least hide themselves from our view. In effect, however, homelessness is much broader, and any understanding of it certainly requires more deeper vision than that first image conjures up.
  • Notes from an American Study of Youth Ministry –  Over the last decade or more, a project entitled ‘Exemplary Youth Ministry’ has been in progress in the United States. Results from the study were published in 2010 in The Spirit and Culture of Youth Ministry: Leading Congregations toward Exemplary Youth Ministry. While there are many differences between the American and Australian contexts, not least in the numbers of churches that can afford paid youth leaders, there are some findings that are important for youth ministry in Australia.
  • Reviewing Church Life –  Reviews of church life take place in many ways such as through an ‘Annual General Meeting’ within a local church,  when the leaders for a region gather such as in a Synod, or when  researchers do an analysis of church life. All such reviews make certain assumptions about what ‘church life’ should be about. The Uniting Church Synod of Victoria and Tasmania has been thinking about these assumptions and suggesting some new ways to conduct reviews.
  • Faith at the Olympics – “Doctors and scientists said breaking the fourminute mile was impossible, that one would die in the attempt. Thus, when I got up from the track after collapsing at the finish line, I figured I was dead.” Roger Bannister’s witty comment on his own achievement captures much of the significance, wider context and even celebrity orientation of sport in the modern world.

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Pointers Vol.17-4 For Downloading

Articles include :
  • The Christian Faith in Rural Australia – The proportion of Australians identifying themselves as Christian is in decline. But is there much difference between the capital cities and outside the capital cities? Are the rural areas the heartland for the Christian faith, or are they too in decline? There are many rural churches struggling, but is this because of declining populations and a lack of ordained clergy, or are other factors having an impact? Analysis of the 2006 Census data and the 2006 National Church Life Survey throws some light on the trends across the nation.
  • Christian Management Today – A growing number of churches and Christian organisations in Australia are becoming aware of the need to have a solid professional base, and yet one that maintains a distinctively Christian approach to administration and  organisation.The organisation Christian Management Australia was formed in 2002, to provide help to churches, organisations and individuals to develop appropriate forms of administration as part of their ministry.
  • Out-of-home Care for Indigenous Children and Young People – The care of Indigenous children is a national issue. We have heard a lot about the problems of Indigenous children, but less about the solutions. What is happening to Indigenous children and young people who need care? In a national study the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) conducted interviews with professionals, carers and Indigenous young people in out-of-home care. The results have been published by the National Child Protection Clearinghouse operating from the AIFS.
  • The Spirit of Generation Y: Young People’s Spirituality in a Changing Australia
    ISBN: 9781920721466 ISBN 13: 9789781920721468 PP: 400
    Authors: Michael Mason, Andrew Singleton and Ruth Webber. Publisher: John Garratt Publishing
    This is a second book on the research conducted through the combined Monash University, Australian Catholic University and Christian Research Association project (from the 2002 pilot study to 2006).
  • Being Single: Some Insights for the Church – Twenty-three per cent of all households in Australia are people living alone. Over the last ten years this proportion has risen while the number of family households has fallen. Among Australian men 15 years and over, 39 per cent have not married nor are living in a de facto relationship. Among women, 45 per cent are not in a partnership. Perhaps more people are choosing the single life-style. Perhaps some find themselves living by themselves because relationships have failed or have never developed. Whatever the reason for the change, the proportion of single person households is growing.

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Pointers Vol.18-1 For Downloading

Pointers Vol 18-1 (March 2008)
Articles include :
  • Why the Lausanne Conference Will be Different –  The 5th International Lausanne Researchers’ Conference will be held at the Geelong Conference Centre from Tuesday 8th to Saturday 12th April 2008. More than 65 people have registered to attend the conference. We are looking forward to a most worthwhile occasion. The Lausanne Conferences are different from other conferences that I attend. They offer something special to those looking at issues of Christian faith and mission.
  • Spiritual Development – A major global challenge for our age is the spiritual development of young people. The Western growth of individualism has laid the responsibility of choice about religious faith and the development of a sense of identity firmly in the hands of individual young people, rather than being something handed on by the communities into which they are born. It has left millions of young people around the world feeling confused about life. On the other hand, some young people have reacted strongly to Western individualism and consumerism by an unquestioning, even fanatical, commitment to their religion or ideology. The result of these two developments around the globe has led to a rise in conflict between the confused and the ‘overcertain’. An understanding of spiritual development is critical to helping young people find meaning and purpose in life and, ultimately, in resolving some of the world tensions.
  • Moving Beyond Forty Years of Missing Generations – Around forty years ago, the age profile of church attenders matched the wider community, but, since the 1960s, younger generations have gone missing. Latest results from the 2006 National Church Life Survey confirm the size of the current gap between church and community, as well as denominational variations. This is ‘old news’ but the need for effective responses by churches are more urgent than ever. In the next two decades, older and younger generations will need to negotiate through a significant period of transition. Perhaps the time is coming for the gap to begin to close.
  • The Global Picture – Issues in Counting Religious Numbers

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Pointers Vol.18-2 For Downloading

Pointers Vol 18-2 (June 2008)
Articles include :
  • Is Decline in Religion Inevitable? Religion and Young People: A Global Perspective – In many countries the task of passing on the Christian faith to younger generations is proving very difficult. In some countries, such as Australia, most young people have little interest in religious organisations. As shown in the graph on this page, young people identify less with Christian groups than do older people in Australian society. It is tempting to believe that this must be the inevitable pattern : hat inevitably the  forces of secularisation will mean that young people lose interest in religion. However, one of the papers presented at the 2008 Lausanne Researchersʼ Conference challenged this through a global review of young people and religious involvement.
  • 5th Lausanne Researchers’ Conference, Geelong, 8-12 April 2008 – Sixty researchers gathered at the Geelong Conference Centre early in April. It was a splendid opportunity to share the research in which we are engaged. Thirty-three papers were offered by the participants, covering a wide range of topics. Each presenter had 45 minutes to describe their research and to engage in conversation with colleagues about it.
  • Transforming Melbourne Painting a Picture of Churches and Community in Melbourne – Christian mission to the city of Melbourne needs a concerted and cooperative effort. It needs all the churches to be involved, working together for common ends. In order to begin the task, an accurate and detailed picture of the church and of the city is needed. No-one has ever ‘painted a picture’ of the whole work of the churches in Greater Melbourne. No-one has ever undertaken to provide a canvas showing all the Christian Churches – their locations, activities, services, and schools. Did you know that there are probably more than 1,800 local churches in the Greater Melbourne area? There are at least 60 Chinese-speaking churches across Melbourne. But how many other ethnic-speaking congregations and parishes exist? How many house churches are active?

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Pointers Vol.18-3 For Downloading

Pointers Vol 18-3 (September 2008)
Articles include :
  • Lay Leadership and the Vitality of Rural Congregations – Within rural Australia, a great range of patterns of organisation of ministry has emerged. Declining and ageing populations and increased costs and limited availability of full-time clergy have forced congregations to re-think how effective ministry can be conducted. Lay forms of leadership have become common. But it is not just a matter of necessity. Some people have argued that in giving ministry into the hands of lay people, it is giving it back to the whole church where it should reside.
  • WORLD YOUTH DAY 2008 –  World Youth Day 2008 was held in Sydney, Australia, with the Theme: “You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses” (Acts 1:8). World Youth Day, as an event, was established by Pope John Paul II in 1986, with the first being held in Rome, “to bring together young Catholics from around the globe to celebrate and learn about their faith on a more regular basis.” The Catholic body responsible is The Pontifical Council for the Laity.
  • Unravelling Identity: Immigrants, Identity and
    Citizenship in Australia

    Trevor Batrouney and John Goldlust
    For me, living overseas raised most poignantly the question of my national or ethnic identity. When I was living in Thailand, I was often asked where I came from. I was not sure how to answer that. I was born in England, but had lived in Australia. I had a British passport at that time, but I was on leave from work in Australia. I was very conscious of being a ‘Westerner’ rather than a Thai, having more in common with Americans and Europeans rather than Thai people, not only in my appearance but in my habits and my ways of thinking.
  • Financial Giving to Churches – This article reviews the financial giving patterns of church attenders. It reveals very different cultures of giving across denominations. However,
    a common trend is that more involved and motivated attenders tend to be more generous givers.
  • Recent Publications in the Religion-and-Film Field – Peter Bentley’s (2007) article in Pointers: Bulletin of the Christian  Research Association entitled “Visual Faith?” provided a good overview of recent internet resources pertaining to movies and the visual media ministry and claimed: “Images are all around us, but it sometimes takes a second look to see what is there” (p. 15). The same advice applies equally well to the many references relating to the emerging interdisciplinary field of religion-and-film (aka sacred cinema, spiritual cinema, holy film, cinematic theology, cinematheology, theo-film, celluloid religion, film-and-faith, film-faith dialogue), which nowadays is slowly turning into an
    excitingly innovative cottage industry. The following is a brief, roughly categorised compilation of selected 2004-2008 items for your enjoyment and edification.
  • Spiritual Capital ? – All businesses need financial capital. Their achievements are measured in the financial capital that they accumulate over time. But businesses need more than financial capital in order to function effectively. They need staff with the appropriate skills and capacities – sometimes referred to as ‘human capital’. The relationships between staff and with suppliers and clients which enable people to work effectively together, qualities of respect, trust and goodwill – sometimes referred to as ‘social capital’ – are also fundamental to the operation of every business. These forms of ‘capital’, financial, human and social, are needed for the effective operation of every human organisation and community, not just businesses. All human communities, whether as small as a family or as large a nation or a multinational company, need resources (which can be measured in financial terms), human skills and capacities, and relationships through which people can act effectively together. Recent literature has argued that there is yet another important factor: spiritual capital.

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